Monthly Archives: April 2011

2009: Why we should care about unions, runaway production, the middle class or about America (the global hegemonic power)

            Throughout the course of writing this project, many individuals I spoke with have asked me why we should care about unions, about runaway production, about the middle class or aboutAmerica as the global hegemonic power. The American Labor Movement … Continue reading

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2000: Mikhail Glattes, Another Death in the Filmmaking Process. IATSE Mainstream Leadership Does Nothing.

Mikhail Glattes was working on a commercial in Canada. The shoot involved helicopter work in the Llewellyn Glacier.  The trained Hollywood pilot on Glattes’s shoot refused to fly his helicopter the day of the shoot because he had work he … Continue reading

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2007. The Macho Filmmaking Culture: Real Men Don’t Save Lives

While many crew members are now college educated, with middle-class backgrounds, on the set there’s an almost “over-macho” spirit, a joining in to the working class ethic.  This is part of a larger issue common to unionized men in traditionally … Continue reading

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1950: Hortense Powdermaker on the Power of Humane-ness in Hollywood

Powdermaker, author of the landmark study, Hollywood: The Dream Factory, was adamant about the importance of humane-ness in the motion picture world: The really important people in the development and growth of the movies, as a popular art form and as … Continue reading

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1950: Hortense Powdermaker on the Cost of Dehumanization in Hollywood

Anthropologist Hortense Powdermaker, in her landmark study of the film business, Hollywood, The Dream Factory, was adamant about the problems that result from dehumanization: “the denial of one’s human characteristics is the most degrading insult that can be offered any man or … Continue reading

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1997: Case Study, Assisant Camera Operator Brent Hershman died of overwork. It had little impact.

Assistant camera operator Brent Hershman died during the filming of Pleasantville (1998). Hershman fell asleep at the wheel after a “normal” twenty-hour work day and was killed.  As a result, filmmakers drafted Brent’s Rule, a set of safety guidelines.  The … Continue reading

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2004. 47.3 % of IATSE 600 film workers have fallen asleep at the wheel after 11-14 hour days.

One aspect of motion picture production that emerged during this new era of location shooting  (post 1970s) was an increased level of danger for the entire crew both due to longer working hours and to unsafe conditions on the set.  Once … Continue reading

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